‘Rebellion of Silence’: New Work by Poet-on-trial Dareen Tatour

Today, October 11, 2017, Poet #DareenTatour is already 2 years imprisoned for a poem…

Arabic Literature (in English)

Today marks two years since Dareen Tatour was arrested, the case against her built against a poem she’d posted on social medial. Jewish Voices for Peace has launched a new video marking these two years, and Andrew Leber has translated one of Tatour’s new poems.

After two years of imprisonment, house arrest, and different stages of her trial, Tatour awaits the verdict, set to be announced on October 17, 2017, in the court in Nazareth.

Rebellion of Silence

By Dareen Tatour

Trans. Andrew Leber

Before my body was torn to pieces

How naïve was I!

I would want to fly,

Fall love with poetry,

Devote myself to love,

Dream of a table to call my own…

Yet after light forced its way in

With the laughter of dawn,

I fell silent –

Filled with anger –

As dreams were dashed,

And the silence broken,

And the flames consumed me!

They…

View original post 477 more words

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Shooting Your Foot through the Windows

When I was studying programming, some million years ago, I encountered a nice explanation about the difference between programming languages. It used a simply uniform “challenge” for each language: “How would you shoot yourself in the foot?” The different implementations were used to explain the special characteristics of each shooting your leglanguage. It stated with “C” where you simply point your gun at your foot and shoot (and nobody will understand what you did). In some more structured languages you will need to construct much more complicated structures to accomplish (or fail to accomplish) the same daily programming task… for good or bad.

Writing software (SW) is sometimes a boring routine work, but new bugs come in all shapes and colors and they always succeed to thrill and astonish me. And the real joy is when you find at last that it was not your bug after all. So here is a nice story from my work.

I had to analyze data from some experiments. To save the results in an orderly way, my SW builds a special directory for each experiment, using the experiment’s ID as part of the directory’s name.

When I first came to install the SW on a customer’s computer, it looked as if everything was running just fine. But when we tried to look at the results there were not one but two directories with the same name and both seemed to be empty. We tried to delete the directories. One was easily deleted but Windows Explorer failed to delete the other. Now I tried to look at the contents of the undeletable directory, but couldn’t view its content (even though initially it seemed to be empty).

I wanted to repeat the experiment, so I tried to rename the undeleted directory and failed. I tried to rename its father directory and Window Explorer refused to do this either. Finally I succeeded to rename the grandfather directory. I repeated the experiment and had another pair of same-name apparently empty directories, one deletable and one stubbornly persistent.

I went back to my development station to scratch my head. I googled “two directories with the same name in Windows”. There were more dummies like me asking “how come I have two directories with the same name” and the only answer I’ve seen there was “no, you don’t”.

I investigated it farther, adding prints at my directory-creating function, and found the answer. The experiment’s data contained the ID string with a blank as the last character. Somehow my SW created two directories, one with the blank on the end of the name and one without it. My customer and I, looking at the two directories’ names, were right to judge that we see exactly the same name.

But apparently it was Windows Explorer that was shooting itself (and me) in the foot most effectively. The data was actually (and correctly) saved in the directory with the blank in its name, but when I selected this directory for display in the Explorer it showed the content of the other empty directory. When the empty directory was removed the blanky directory refused to show its contents, or to be deleted or renamed.

To be fair and technically helpful, it was an old Windows Vista operation system on the customer’s computer. If you succeed to repeat such a bug on any other system please let me know.

* * *

Feedback about UNIX

I have a good friend from the UNIX world. He would regularly reproach me for sticking with MS Windows…

But when he called today he said the problem of file names that end with blanks is well known in UNIX. It is common practice to create files by scripts, so there are more opportunities to add blanks to names by mistake. And, there also, common graphical file-handling tools fail to handle these files. He even mentioned that intentionally creating such files is a known “practical joke” in the community.

It is so wired… wrongly wired

Only in Israel: Personally Delivered SMS – straight from the Shabak

At first glance it looked like a foolish error – or the now so common tech firms’ scam.

Iris received a short SMS from Bezeq, informing that her time of reduced pay for fast internet connection will soon be over, and that, starting October 13, she will pay 120.97 shekel monthly.

sms from bezek - renewal

Misdirected SMS

The first question that came to her mind was, of course, for how long she was already paying for Bezeq “services” without her knowledge, as she never even requested their service to connect to the net? So she immediately called Bezeq and they checked her id number, and checked her telephone number, and checked my id number and my telephone number, and promised that they don’t hold these numbers in their databases and never charged us anything.

Somewhat relieved, Iris reread the short note carefully and noticed that the telephone number of the client that was mentioned there was not her number… But that number seemed familiar; it was the number of a comrade from Tel Aviv.

Iris called the comrade and it came out that she was connected through Bezeq, and that her special agreement was really due to expire sometime soon. She thanked Iris for informing her that she should take care before her monthly pay will be automatically hiked.

Scrolling up in the same SMS application, Iris found that she also received a message from Bezeq in March, concerning the expected visit of a technician. The comrade from Tel Aviv recalled that she really applied for the technician to come and was disappointed with Bezeq that promised to send her a message but their message never arrived…

Simple explanation

Well, you might think that the numbers are somewhat similar and it could be a simple typo, but they are not similar in any way. They differ by almost all digits… And Iris’s number was never registered in Bezeq’s database anyway, so there is no way that Bezeq could have made this mistake.

But Bezeq is only the first station on the SMS’s Via Dolorosa. Before it could land in the comrade’s phone it had to pass by the Shabak’s office and have a short chat with a Tonton Macoute wearing black glasses. After it explains itself and proves its innocence and good intentions, the SMS is kicked out and rolls all the way down to its original destination… or to another comrade, as there are so few Jewish leftists and they all look the same.

Retrospective view

This wired experience reminded us of the eighties and nineties of the previous century…

It was not rare up then to have your phone ringing, or raise the phone’s receiver to make a call, and hear a conversation by some comrades in other towns around the country, who thought they were speaking just between themselves. We would then curse the Shabak for using such old leaky wires in their wiretapping centers.

On a second thought, the new SMS misdirection errors may be just the teething problems of a new Artificial Intelligence start-up that was hired to catch the data balls in the air and throw them on in almost real-time. We really shouldn’t be angry with the novice techies for not yet recognizing all the old comrades by their names and phone numbers.

Message from the Shabak Caricature

Dareen Tatour’s Trial: Step by Step

As I tried to make some order in the new “Free Dareen Tatour” site – I found it might be helpful to have all the hearings of the trial described in chronological order – with links to detailed reports for each hearing. I liked it so much that I re-publish it here. Any comment or proposals for additional links will be most welcomed.

On October 11, 2015, Palestinian poet Dareen Tatour was arrested by the Israeli police in a pre-dawn raid on her house in Reineh.

The Indictment

On November 2, 2015, she was indicted in the Magistrates’ Court in Nazareth for “incitement to violence” and “support of a terrorist organization”.

The indictment is all based on three publications by Tatour:

1) The poem “Resist My People, Resist Them” – which Tatour published in her Youtube channel and Facebook page. A distorted Hebrew translation of the poem, made by a policeman with no qualification in translation or literature, is fully cited in the indictment document.

2) A Facebook post mentioning that Islamic Jihad called for an intifada in the West Bank and later contains a call for intifada within the green line to support Muslim’s rights to pray in the Al-Aqsa mosque. From this post the indictment infers the accusation of “supporting a terrorist organization”. Clearly the reference to Islamic Jihad is just citing a news item and Tatour explained her call for intifada as a call for legitimate mass struggle.

3) The last publication mentioned in the indictment is composed of two pictures: A picture of Israa Abed (a women from Nazareth that was wrongly suspected as a terrorist attacker) lying on the floor of the Afula central bus station after she was shot by Israeli police and guards – posted as Tatour’s wallpaper on Facebook – and a small black picture with white Arabic writing “I am the next martyr”, that was her profile picture. The prosecution claims that by posting these two pictures together Tatour was inciting for violence. Tatour explained that the profile picture “I’m the next martyr” was first posted by her and by many activists after the burning alive of Palestinian teen Muhammad Abu-Khdeir in Jerusalem in June 2014. It was a protest at the killing of innocent Palestinians that was reused after the murder of Kheir Hamdan by Israeli police in Kafr Kana in November 2014. And she published the picture of Israa Abed after watching a video of her shooting and being sure that she was shot even though she didn’t attack anyone – a claim currently accepted by the Israeli authorities.

First hearing, April 13, 2016 – The police translator

In the first hearing of the trial, on April 13, 2016, the prosecutor chose to start presenting her case with the Hebrew translation of the “Resist” poem. For this purpose she brought the police translator, Warrant Officer Nissim Bishara. The veteran policeman testified in court that his qualification for translating the poem was his study of literature in high school and his love for the Arab language.

You can follow the links for a report in English about this hearing, or for a more detailed Hebrew report.

Second hearing, May 5, 2016 – Demonstration and closed doors

Before the second hearing on May 5, 2016, there was a solidarity vigil with Tatour in front of the Nazareth court. As a result there was more media attention and Haaretz wrote about the trial for the first time (in English and Hebrew).

Because of the vigil, many people, including some Arab Knesset members, came to attend the hearing. The judge didn’t like it and held the hearing beyond closed doors.

Another policeman gave evidence about details of Tatour’s interrogation. See a report here (and in Hebrew).

Third hearing, July 17, 2016 – Proving the Facebook

On the 3rd hearing on July 17, 2016, the prosecutor brought as witnesses Tatour’s best friend Samira and her young brother Ahmad to prove that her Facebook page belongs to her – a fact that she herself testified to repeatedly in her interrogations in the police.

The prosecutor also brought as a witness Rami Amer from Kafr Qasim, one of the organizers of the yearly commemoration of the Kafr Qasim massacre. They brought him to witness how and why he invited Tatour to read from her poems in the commemoration ceremony. Initially Tatour was interrogated about her participation in this commemoration as part of the accusations against her. Later the prosecutor tried to use it to prove that she is a famous poet, and for this reason her incitement constitutes severe danger to state security. In the court Amer explained that “the fact that I know her as a poet doesn’t mean that she is a known poet”.

You can see detailed reports about this hearing in Arabic and Hebrew.

Forth hearing, September 6, 2016 – Interrogating the interrogator

For this hearing Tatour’s lawyer Abed Fahoum made the not-so-common effort to go over the video that documented her interrogation by Officer Samer Khalil. He confronted the prosecutor witness with big gaps between what was recorded on the video and what was written in the interrogation’s protocol.

Finally the video proved, and the officer had to admit, that Tatour was forced to sign the protocol (written by Khalil in Hebrew, even though the interrogation was held in Arabic), without being allowed to read it, as she explicitly requested to do.

With this testimony the prosecutor rested her case.

Tatour had to start her testimony on the same day, but the court failed to find a translator.

You can follow the link for a detailed report about this hearing (and in Hebrew).

Fifth to seventh hearings, November 17 & 24, 2016 and January 26, 2017 – Tatour’s testimony

On November 17 the trial resumed and Tatour had new lawyers, Gaby Lasky from Tel Aviv, accompanied by Nery Ramati from her office.

In her testimony Tatour admitted to posting all the publications that were attributed to her in their original Arabic form, but explained that the police translation distorted her words and that the police and prosecution distorted their meaning. She explained how all her publications were legitimate expression of protest against the crimes of the Israeli occupation and the settlers, and that all her calls for struggle are not meant to incite violence.

In three long sessions of counter interrogation the prosecutor Alina Hardak grilled Tatour again and again about many details from her publications, her interrogations in the police, other posts on her Facebook page and even comments by other people on her page. She tried to mislead Tatour, enter words to her mouth and find contradictions in her explanations – but couldn’t divert Tatour from her simple and sincere explanation of her publications.

You can read more about it here in Mondoweiss (and in Hebrew here and here).

Eighth hearing, March 19, 2017 – Experts’ opinion for the defense

On March 19, 2017, the defense presented two expert witnesses, Professor Nissim Calderon and Dr. Yoni Mendel.

Professor Calderon, an expert in Hebrew literature, explained how the most famous Hebrew poets expressed furious protest under Tsarist Russia and the British Mandate in Palestine. They were never prosecuted for their poetry by these undemocratic regimes like Tatour is now targeted by supposedly “democratic” Israel.

Dr. Mendel presented his own translation to Hebrew of the “Resist” poem and explained how the police translation distorted its meaning.

They were both grilled in counter interrogation by the prosecutor, trying to prove that they were not objective, that Tatour was not a poet and that the Palestinians were not living under occupation.

These counter interrogations produced many surrealistic dialogues that were cited in many articles and some of it has even constituted the text of a short play that was shown in the Yaffa Theater in a solidarity event with Tatour on August 30, 2017.

You can read more about it in English (also here and here), in Spanishin Hebrew (also here and here) and in Arabic.

Ninth hearing, March 28, 2017 – The defense claims discrimination in the enforcement of the law

On March 28 the defense brought as a witness a police officer, who presented to the court a statistical report about interrogations and indictments concerning incitement. The defense claimed that these statistics prove that the enforcement of the incitement law is one-sided against Arabs, ignoring severe Anti-Arab incitement by Jewish Israelis.

The defense rested its case, but then the prosecution surprised everybody with a request to present more evidence.

You can read about it here (and in Hebrew).

Tenth hearing, April 27, 2017 – The prosecution tries to use Tatour’s first lawyer against her

The trial of poet Dareen Tatour was resumed in Nazareth Magistrate’s Court on Thursday, April 27, at 12:00, before Judge Adi Bambiliya.

In this hearing the last prosecution witness testified, after all defense witnesses were heard in March. The witness was a lawyer who advised Tatour on the first day of her detention, in October 2015. As Tatour mentioned his advice in her testimony, the prosecutor took the rare step to force the lawyer to testify for the prosecution in order to disproof Tatour’s words. In the court the lawyer, Hussam Mow’ed, didn’t remember any details from his meeting with Tatour, only how shocked he was at her situation after being dragged from bed to the police station at the middle of the night. Anyway, with this nonsense the prosecutor prolonged the trial and added another full month to Tatour’s house detention. This was the last hearing before the verdict. The judge gave each of the sides 45 days to prepare written summaries. She didn’t set a date for herself for giving the verdict, saying that she will set a date for the verdict only after she will have the summaries, “as they are likely to be delayed anyway”.

Detailed report in Hebrew about this hearing was published in Free Haifa and Local Call.

As of April 27, Dareen Tatour was still under strict house arrest. She is allowed to go out of her house only for 2 hours a day, from 17:00 till 19:00. At any time, at home and while going out, she should be accompanied by one of the “guardians” – her parents, two brothers and a sister in law – who deposited and signed big bail sums and will pay them to the court in case that Tatour will access the internet.

 

‘A Poet’s Hallucinations,’ by Dareen Tatour

Arabic Literature (in English)

Dareen Tatour’s “A Poet’s Hallucinations,” translated by Jonathan Wright, comes ahead of PEN America’s planned month of solidarity with Tatour, who was first arrested in October 2015, charged with incitement to violence primarily over a poem (translated to English here), and has been in jail and on house arrest since.

The verdict in Tatour’s trial is currently set for October 17 at noon in the Nazareth court. By this time, the poet will be exactly two years and a week in detention.

You can follow the course of her trial at freedareentatour.org/trial.

  1. The Desire Hallucination

Desire builds a nest

Between the branches of my love.

It sings like a bulbul, night and day

And sweeps through me like fire through straw.

It tears my eyes from my face

And disfigures my features.

It steals all the furniture in my soul

So I sit and lament my luck.

  1. The…

View original post 385 more words

A New Translation of Palestinian Poet Dareen Tatour’s ‘I… Who Am I?’

The wonderful people of ArabLit are doing a great job to help the solidarity campaign to release Palestinian poet Dareen Tatour – Thanks you!

Arabic Literature (in English)

On August 30, despite public threats to withdraw funding from Israeli Minister of Culture Miri Regev and Minister of Finance Moshe Kahlon, poets, writers, and readers gathered in Yaffa to hold a solidarity event with Dareen Tatour, who was first arrested in October 2015, charged with incitement to violence primarily over a poem (translated to English here), and has been in jail and on house arrest since:

From the solidarity event in Yaffa. Photo: Arab48.

The solidarity event, according to a report in Arab48, included both poetry readings and a discussion of Tatour’s legal case by lawyers and activists. Tatour’s father was also there to thank those in attendance. According to multiple reports, both Regev and Kahlon threatened to use their power to defund the theatre in Yaffa that held the event.

Several US literary figures also renewed their calls for Tatour’s freedom.

As to the next step in…

View original post 402 more words

US Literary Figures Renew Call for Freedom for Palestinian Poet Dareen Tatour

Eileen Myles, Naomi Shihab Nye, Ayelet Waldman, Jacqueline Woodson among writers in solidarity with imprisoned poet

August 29, 2017 – Prominent US poets, writers, playwrights and publishers issued statements today in support of imprisoned Palestinian poet Dareen Tatour ahead of her upcoming trial verdict on October 17.  The statements calling for her freedom, and demanding that Israel drop all charges against Dareen, released by Jewish Voice for Peace and Adalah-NY, come just as the Israeli government threatens to cut funding to a Yaffa Theater that agreed to host an artists’ solidarity event for Tatour on August 30th. Tatour, a Palestinian citizen of Israel, was arrested by Israeli authorities 22 months ago, in October 2015, and charged with incitement to violence primarily over a poem she posted online, “Resist, My People, Resist Them,” as well as two Facebook posts.

Following an initial three months of imprisonment after her arrest, Tatour has been held under house arrest for over a year-and-a-half. At her upcoming October 17 court date she expects to receive a verdict from an Israel court with high rates of conviction for both Palestinians living under Israeli military occupation as well as Palestinian citizens of Israel.

Numerous freedom of expression and literary organizations including PEN InternationalPEN America, and PEN South Africa have called for Tatour’s freedom, as have many Israeli artists and Israeli citizens. The 12 literary figures whose statements are being issued today are among 300 writers, including 11 Pulitzer Prize-winners, who signed a 2016 letter calling for freedom for Tatour after she was first arrested. These statements of solidarity with Dareen Tatour come from: Susan Abulhawa, Ben Ehrenreich, Deborah Eisenberg, Marilyn Hacker, Randa Jarrar, MJ Kaufman, Eileen Myles, Naomi Shihab Nye, John Oakes, Sarah Schulman, Ayelet Waldman and Jacqueline Woodson. Six of the statements follow. All 12 statements are available here.

Ben Ehrenreich, Writer: “When one fights without fear—when one fights with love instead, fighting looks like something else entirely. Like poetry. Dareen Tatour resists without fear, with poetry and with love, and they will not silence her. Stay strong, Dareen—we are with you.”

Randa Jarrar, Writer: “We must call on the international community to place pressure on Israel to release Dareen and other political prisoners whose ‘crimes’ are those of self-expression and resistance. No one should be forbidden from using the internet, publishing their writing, or attending events, whether they be political or not. The fact that writer Dareen Tatour continues to be placed under house arrest and only allowed out with a guardian is misogynist, racist, and unjust.”

Eileen Myles, Poet: Israel’s claim to be a democracy is roundly trounced by this attempt to silence Dareen Tatour. Language lives and dies in poetry and the human cry for freedom breathes in a poets utterance. A poet never stands alone and I’m proud to stand with the people of Palestine and globally who demand that Dareen Tatour’s voice and words are not criminalized, penalized and obstructed. As a human and a citizen of the earth it is her and all of our right to write and be heard.

Naomi Shihab Nye, Poet and Writer: “It’s an absolute outrage that poet Dareen Tatour has been treated this way by so-called democracy Israel for speaking truth and using the word Resist. We all resist. She deserves nothing but freedom and even bigger paper and more pens! We speak up for her in the name of justice and our own tax dollars channeled Israel’s direction for way too many years.”

Ayelet Waldman, Writer: “Two years ago Dareen Tatour was torn from her home in the middle of the night. A poet, incarcerated by Netanyahu’s right wing government for the crime of making her art. This must stop. She must be released.”

Jacqueline Woodson, Poet and Author: “I believe Dareen Tatour should be free to leave her home, to write what she needs to write for her own empowerment, to live her life as poet. Freely.”

Although the conditions of her house arrest were somewhat improved after the public outcry from the literary and international community in 2016, Dareen is still forbidden from using the internet, publishing any of her writings, or participating in any political events.

Dareen Tatour’s case represents just one of countless examples of Israel’s systematic suppression of Palestinian arts, culture and political expression. For example, Israel’s Minister of Culture Miri Regev continues to try to ban public readings of the poetry of the late, renowned Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish, and to shut down plays about Palestinian prisoners. Just recently, 67-year-old writer Ahmad Qatamesh was released by Israel after three months of imprisonment without charge. Dr. Qatamesh, named a prisoner of conscience by Amnesty International, has been jailed periodically for eight of the last 25 years.

Over 400 Palestinians, in both the occupied Palestinian territories and in Israel have been arrested for posts on social media in the last year alone. According to the Palestinian prisoners’ rights group Addameer, Israel currently holds 6,128 Palestinian political prisoners, including 450 Palestinian “administrative detainees” held without charge or trial, 320 child prisoners and 62 Palestinian women. Since 1967 more than 800,000 Palestinians from the occupied Palestinian territories (oPt) have been detained under Israeli military orders.

The full list of new statements from literary figures can be viewed here.

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Jewish Voice for Peace is a national, grassroots organization inspired by Jewish tradition to work for a just and lasting peace  according to principles of human rights, equality, and international law for  all the people of Israel and Palestine. JVP has over 200,000 online supporters,  over 70 chapters, a youth wing, a Rabbinic Council, an Artist Council, an  Academic Advisory Council, and an Advisory Board made up of leading U.S.  intellectuals and artists.

Adalah-NY: The New York Campaign for the Boycott of Israel is a local, grassroots, non-hierarchical volunteer-only group of concerned individuals that advocates for justice, equality, and human rights for the Palestinian people. Adalah-NY organizes in support of the 2005 call by Palestinian civil society to maintain non-violent means of protest — including boycotts, divestment, and sanctions — until Israel respects Palestinians’ fundamental rights.